sirupin

jessicachastains:

twofishies:

lightspeedsound:

all-the-fangirl-feels:

#remember how this movie took female stereotypes and crushed them into a million pieces

casual reminder that Elle Woods scored a 179 on the LSAT, which is one point shy of a perfect score.

Casual reminder that Whatshisface here had family connections and was a legacy and shit, whereas Elle Woods came out of nowhere.

casual reminder that Elle Woods actually had an amazing background in real life issues that people dismissed as unimportant but managed to not only learn the law, but learned how to apply the law.

Casual reminder that Elle Woods used her lawyer skills to save a woman from an abusive relationship and also save another woman from trumped up murder charges and basically what I’m saying is you go, girl, go get ‘em Elle Woods, thank you for this movie.

what’s fantastic about this movie is that it’s not that fucked up brand of feminism where the girls who arent like other girls and sip tea and read hemingway look down on the blonde party sluts. the message of the movie is like, you can be blonde and attractive AND enjoy stuff like shopping and partying and you can still be smart and kick ass!!!

bespectacledtitan
galactic-kat:

wasarahbi:

emes:

leeantsypantsy:

all-aboutqoqo:



“We dressed up as the book Madeline, with six people dressed up as her and me as Ms. Clavel, their teacher. One of the Madelines, however, was the truly special one…the one with the beard, that is. Our experience was hysterical—I’d walk all the girls (and one guy) down the street in two straight lines. Guys would be walking the other way, whistling or hollering at all the pretty ladies. Then, as they got to the back of the line, they’d see my friend Brennan, then they’d see me, and I could tell that they were suddenly wondering if ALL the Madelines were men.”




the last sentence

lmao what

There will never be a time when I don’t reblog this because it is my fave.

galactic-kat:

wasarahbi:

emes:

leeantsypantsy:

all-aboutqoqo:

“We dressed up as the book Madeline, with six people dressed up as her and me as Ms. Clavel, their teacher. One of the Madelines, however, was the truly special one…the one with the beard, that is. Our experience was hysterical—I’d walk all the girls (and one guy) down the street in two straight lines. Guys would be walking the other way, whistling or hollering at all the pretty ladies. Then, as they got to the back of the line, they’d see my friend Brennan, then they’d see me, and I could tell that they were suddenly wondering if ALL the Madelines were men.”

the last sentence

lmao what

There will never be a time when I don’t reblog this because it is my fave.

pryinglittlepandora
hannahcompton:

simplytonka:

oregonrighttolife:

1) “I’m sorry to say I couldn’t think about raising a child with Down’s. I’m something of a perfectionist.”2) “If he can’t grow up to have a shot at becoming the president, we don’t want him.”3) “It’s devastating, it’s a waste, all the love that goes into kids like that.”4) “I just couldn’t do it, couldn’t be that kind of mother who accepts everything, loves her kid no matter what.”5) “The bottom line is when my neighbor said to me: ‘Having a “tard,” that’s a bummer for life.’”These are ACTUAL RESPONSES from parents who sought prenatal screening to determine if their child had Down Syndrome. The parents all intended to abort their baby if he/she were diagnosed with DS, and these were some of the reasons they gave for their decision. THIS is the elitist, discriminatory, ugly side of our culture—a culture that has grown to value our own “health” and “happiness” over the life of another who we deem lesser. How can any society profess diversity, acceptance, and tolerance if it is utterly intolerant of the sick or the handicapped among them? Killing the mentally handicapped (who are statistically proven to live happy, fulfilling lives) before they are born is not kindness—it’s the darkest form of selfishness. Those aren’t all the quotes. Read the rest here: http://bit.ly/1p5UVPp

I’m crying. 

Heartbreaking.

hannahcompton:

simplytonka:

oregonrighttolife:

1) “I’m sorry to say I couldn’t think about raising a child with Down’s. I’m something of a perfectionist.”

2) “If he can’t grow up to have a shot at becoming the president, we don’t want him.”

3) “It’s devastating, it’s a waste, all the love that goes into kids like that.”

4) “I just couldn’t do it, couldn’t be that kind of mother who accepts everything, loves her kid no matter what.”

5) “The bottom line is when my neighbor said to me: ‘Having a “tard,” that’s a bummer for life.’”

These are ACTUAL RESPONSES from parents who sought prenatal screening to determine if their child had Down Syndrome. The parents all intended to abort their baby if he/she were diagnosed with DS, and these were some of the reasons they gave for their decision. 

THIS is the elitist, discriminatory, ugly side of our culture—a culture that has grown to value our own “health” and “happiness” over the life of another who we deem lesser. How can any society profess diversity, acceptance, and tolerance if it is utterly intolerant of the sick or the handicapped among them? 

Killing the mentally handicapped (who are statistically proven to live happy, fulfilling lives) before they are born is not kindness—it’s the darkest form of selfishness. 

Those aren’t all the quotes. Read the rest here: http://bit.ly/1p5UVPp

I’m crying. 

Heartbreaking.

serenecourageouswisdom

thebrokenheartedthatstillsing:

maxkirin:

"This sentence has five words. Here are five more words. Five-word sentences are fine. But several together become monotonous. Listen to what is happening. The writing is getting boring. The sound of it drones. It’s like a stuck record. The ear demands some variety. Now listen. I vary the sentence length, and I create music. Music. The writing sings. It has a pleasant rhythm, a lilt, a harmony. I use short sentences. And I use sentences of medium length. And sometimes, when I am certain the reader is rested, I will engage him with a sentence of considerable length, a sentence that burns with energy and builds with all the impetus of a crescendo, the roll of the drums, the crash of the cymbals—sounds that say listen to this, it is important.” - Gary Provost

Reading this was so satisfying woah